Thought and Reflections

minazarei:


asperatus cloud x

IT’S LIKE WATCHING THE WAVES ABOVE YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN

minazarei:

asperatus cloud x

IT’S LIKE WATCHING THE WAVES ABOVE YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN

(Source: dilfgod)

samanthasunshiinee:

there-was-no-other-sound:

rnultiplayer:

wanna know what a cow looks like washed and blow dried?

image

image

that is what a cow looks like washed and blow dried

FLUFFY MILK HORSE

This is the most important thing.

(Source: rnultiplayer)

mightyhealthyquest:

IT’S ALWAYS TEA TIME!

agnostic-gnostic:

vintageblackglamour:
Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman, the first African-American female pilot, on January 24, 1923. Coleman was a 28-year-old manicurist in Chicago when she became interested in aviation. After being rejected by every flying school she applied to, Coleman took the advice of Chicago Defender publisher Robert Abbott and went to France to learn to fly. Before she left, she learned French at a Berlitz school in the Chicago loop and, with financial support from Abbott and her own savings from her work as a manicurist and the manager of a chili parlor, Coleman left for Paris on November 20, 1920. 
Ms. Coleman performed in countless air shows over the years and encouraged other African-Americans to learn to fly before her own tragic death at age 34 on April 30, 1926. Her funeral, attended by 10,000 mourners on Chicago’s South Side, was presided over by the legendary journalist and activist Ida B. Wells.

agnostic-gnostic:

vintageblackglamour:

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman, the first African-American female pilot, on January 24, 1923. Coleman was a 28-year-old manicurist in Chicago when she became interested in aviation. After being rejected by every flying school she applied to, Coleman took the advice of Chicago Defender publisher Robert Abbott and went to France to learn to fly. Before she left, she learned French at a Berlitz school in the Chicago loop and, with financial support from Abbott and her own savings from her work as a manicurist and the manager of a chili parlor, Coleman left for Paris on November 20, 1920. 

Ms. Coleman performed in countless air shows over the years and encouraged other African-Americans to learn to fly before her own tragic death at age 34 on April 30, 1926. Her funeral, attended by 10,000 mourners on Chicago’s South Side, was presided over by the legendary journalist and activist Ida B. Wells.

This is for the times you went through hell so someone else wouldn’t have to.

Andrea Gibson, Say Yes (via itscherryamber)

(Source: hellomyoldheart-x)

disclosable:

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.

Gary Lane

reallifebfg:

georgeslays:

The reasons to love the British Royal family never end

It’s like they’re in a sitcom.

Happy Birthday Hermione!

(Source: simplypotterheads)

klefable:

shockingly, kids are sick and tired of paying hundreds of dollars for overpriced stacks of paper!!!!!! who wouldve thought!!!!!!

(Source: wolverxne)

acmonme:

send your pics at yyqm@wupics.com

(Source: sebadasstian-stan)

Men:
If Orange is the New Black is so good with representation, why are all the men horrible?
Women:
They're not all horrible. Bennett's nice. What more do you want?
Men:
But he's clueless and irresponsible! And that's just ONE guy! How can you give me ONE decent male character in a slew of diverse female characters and call THAT representation?
Women:
Women:
Women:
Women:
Women:
Women:
Women:
...must be tough.

i-freakin-love-disney:

killerdraco:

memewhore:

disneyworldwonders:

Can I just say that I think this is the way Mulan should appear int the parks. In the beginning of the movie they make it very clear that the dress she wears to meet the matchmaker is not comfortable nor does it represent her personality. She spends the whole of the film proving that she is not a prize to be won or just a pawn to be married off at earliest convenience. She proves her worth in this outfit. She saves China in this outfit. She falls in love in this outfit. She risks her life, makes her strongest friendships, and changes the entire country IN THIS OUTFIT. Then they have her walk around the park in the same outfit she wore in the first scene of the movie and I think it is really negative toward her character. That is not who she is.

image

I’ve seen this post pop up on my dash time and time again, and it’s never quite sat right with me. I agree 120% with the idea that the pink “matchmaker dress” is a poor way to represent Mulan in the theme parks, but… so is her soldier armor. It’s just as much not who she is as the pink dress. It represents her pretending to be Ping, and her deceiving everyone around her. It is her pretending to be a man, to be someone else entirely. Honestly, if you want to talk about the outfit that best represents her, I’d suggest this one:

image

The outfit she wore when she defeated Shan Yu. That is who Mulan is; a warrior, but still a woman. It displays all of the strength that she truly has, yet still manages to be true to who she truly is. This it the outfit that she changed the entire country in; would anything have changed if she was still pretending to be a man? I doubt it. This proves that a woman can be strong, but still be feminine. Given that many people tend to equate being feminine with weakness, I think portraying that the two are not mutually exclusive is a damn powerful message to be portraying to kids in theme parks.

Just my two cents.

THANK YOU

(Source: Flickr / klingon65)

http://mccullers-p.tumblr.com/post/97883531094/shinykari-madmaudlingoes-bropakpro 

shinykari:

madmaudlingoes:

bropakpro:

touch-my-cuboner:

zecretary:

zecretary:

the stereotype that women talk more than men is infinitely amusing to me because men are literally incapable of shutting the fuck up

i hope this post gets popular enough that i…

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